Problem Identification: Convincing Evidence

In-depth rubric explanations, examples, and video exemplars.

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Highest Quality Rating (4 points)

The evidence presented is credible.

Written Example: Example: Presenters provide enough information about the problem to appear credible and the information is presented in a compelling manner. Typically groups that receive the highest scores on the “Naming the Problem” indicator also receive a similar score on this indicator because of the amount of data provided. However, this indicator is subjective and solely relies on the reviewers’ discretion.

Video Example: This is exemplary because the presenters clearly named the problem as: balancing the water budget. The team also provided convincing evidence of the extent of the problem: the scarcity of water in is an immediate issue in California but also will become a significant concern in 40 out of 50 other states across the country

Higher Quality Rating (3 points)

The evidence is lacking certain details or clarity, which made it just “sort of” convincing.

Written Example: Presenters provide enough information about the problem to appear somewhat credible but not enough information to convince the reviewer that their topic is actually a problem that requires a policy solution. Typically groups that receive a 3 score on the “Naming the Problem” indicator also receive a similar score on this indicator because of the amount of data provided. However, this indicator is subjective and solely relies on the reviewers’ discretion. 


Mid-Quality Rating (2 points)

The presenters offered data but it was not credible or convincing. 

Written Example: Presenters provide some evidence about the problem, however the evidence provided did not compel the reviewer to believe that the topic was deserving of further inquiry. Typically groups that receive a 2 score on the “Naming the Problem” indicator also receive a similar score on this indicator because of the credible nature of the data. However, this indicator is subjective and solely relies on the reviewers’ discretion.

Video Example: This example is high quality because it identifies the problem as: Food options in our community drastically affect eating habits, thus causing diabetes and obesity. This presentation was rated as high quality but not exemplary because: the explanation only provides some evidence of the extent of the problem, and the audience may assume the presentation is about diabetes.

Lowest Quality Rating (1 point)

The presentation did not offer any data or evidence.

While the presenters did introduce a problem, they do not provide any evidence or data that serves to compel the audience to believe in the credibility of the problem.