Response to Questions: Response to Disagreement or Counter-argument

In-depth rubric explanations, examples, and video exemplars.

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Highest Quality Rating (3 points)

Presenters show they listened and understood the counter-argument; they respond without relying on their script or outside help. Response expands on prior points or adds a new point.

Written Example: In a presentation where students proposed a policy for new city budgeting that would provide more resources for homeless shelters, an audience member asks t “Wouldn’t this be enabling people who are simply lazy and do not want to work?” In response, the student first acknowledges the comment and that some audience members might fear that this proposal just contributes to dependency on services. But the student goes on to say that they thought about this issue and that the resources will be distributed in ways that enable people to support themselves and get back on their feet. A second student adds that we have a moral obligation to people who have experienced poverty or discrimination.

Video Example: After hearing the students propose a mandatory government-funded class on cyber-bullying, an adult audience member concerns about the constitutionality of the proposed policy being recommended. She asks if the students have consulted with anyone on the possibility of infringing on free speech or violating any other constitutional rights. The presenters respond with confidence and defend the legality and constitutionality of their policy proposal, explaining how the class teaches about cyber-bullying and does not impede on individual rights. The students are also able to refer to their data for support of their policy proposal being constitutional.

Higher Quality Rating (2 points)

Presenters respond by repeating their prior talking points.

Written Example: In a presentation where students proposed a policy for new city budgeting that would provide more resources for homeless shelters, an adult audience member asked the student, “Wouldn’t this be enabling people who are simply lazy and do not want to work?” In responding to the query, the students refer back to their powerpoint presentation which outlines their original proposal and restates their goals.  . They offer no further arguments or reasons to rebut the assumptions in the audience question.

Lower Quality Rating (1 point)

Presenters fumble, do not respond, or look to an outside person for help.

Written Example: Example:In a presentation where students proposed a policy for new city budgeting that would provide more resources for homeless shelters, an adult audience member asked the student, “Wouldn’t this be enabling people who are simply lazy and do not want to work?” The students look towards their faculty advisor for support in answering. After a long pause, one student begins to respond but the answer is confusing and unclear and it is unclear if they agree or disagree with the questioner. Or, the students look at each other and no one wants to respond so they go to the next question. .