Convincing Evidence

Rubric Rating Video Examples
Highest Rating: Yes, the evidence presented was credible and convincing to me.

Example: To receive this score, the presenters would have to present an argument so grounded and compelling that the viewer felt as if they were now fully on board with the fact that the presented problem was indeed a problem (?)

No video in doc.

 

Mid-level Rating: The evidence was lacking certain details or clarity, which made it just “sort of” convincing.

Example: To receive this score, the presenters would have to present an argument that almost fully compelled the viewer to feel as if the presented problem was indeed a problem. The presenter might experience a sense of “I basically believe that this is a problem, but I feel like I might need one or two more sources of data to be sure.”

No video in doc.

 

Lower-Level Rating: The presenters offered data but it was not credible or convincing.

 

Example: To receive this score, the presenters would present an argument that did not move the viewer to be sure that indeed a problem deserving of further inquiry.

This example is lower quality because although data was collected, no context is provided for the data. Rather than asking participants in their survey, “How does the food we have provided compare to the school’s current food?” or, “Do you like the food we have provided more than the food the school normally provides?”  the presenters asked if participants loved, liked or tried their food; treating their taste test as an isolated event.

Lowest-Level Rating: The presentation did not offer any data or evidence.

Example: While the presenters did introduce a problem, they do not provide any evidence or data that serves to compel the audience to believe in the credibility of the problem.  

 

No video in doc.